Theatre Review: “The Price”

The Price THE PRICE CAST Mark Ruffalo Victor Franz Tony Shalhoub Walter Franz Jessica Hecht Esther Franz Danny DeVito Gregory Solomon THE PRICE CREATIVE Arthur Miller Playwright Terry Kinney Director Derek McLane—Set Designer Sarah J. Holden—Costume Designer David Weiner—Lighting Designer Rob Milburn & Michael Bodeen—Sound Designers

I’m a little odd when it comes to Arthur Miller. The big hits, Death of a Salesman and The Crucible leave me cold. Oh, I can appreciate that they are thoughtful, insightful and well made, but beyond that? My fave Miller is the almost-never produced Depression epic, The American Clock. And now I can count The Price, about the lingering effects of the Depression thirty years on, as my second favorite.

Part of the reason I’ve taken to The Price: the usually too-earnest Miller injects some welcome humor into the proceedings, in the person of Gregory Solomon (Danny DeVito), an octogenarian furniture dealer. Solomon’s also a former vaudevillian, which is more than evident in the charm and by-play he brings to his negotiations. Solomon is hired by Victor Franz (Mark Ruffalo) to appraise his family’s furniture, all that is left of his father’s estate.

As Solomon, DeVito is impeccably cast. Imbuing Solomon with nearly inexhaustible spunk, DeVito makes sure that we know the man has a purpose for every word he says, though it is almost never just what’s on the surface. He puts him across as the kind of guy who will make you absolutely love him, even though he may be taking advantage of you. Victor does his best to resist his wiles, but can’t help admiring him.

Victor is the character on whom all the play’s action hinges, and Ruffalo does a terrific job of conveying how the trauma of the Depression has never ceased to haunt and petrify him. Jessica Hecht, who plays Victor’s wife Esther, is one of the most skilled interpreters of Miller around, and gives Esther a good deal more love of both her husband and life than is actually in the lines, to compelling effect. Tony Shalhoub plays Victor’s cynical doctor brother, and does a great job of projecting surface confidence, when really there’s a terror of the abyss below – just as affected by the Depression as Victor, in his own way. Recommended.

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To learn about Jonathan Warman’s directing work, see jonathanwarman.com.

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Written by Jonathan Warman

Jonathan Warman

Jonathan Warman is GaySocialites.com’s exclusive theatre critic. He also writes regular music and cabaret reviews. Jonathan is also accomplished freelance Stage Director. You can e-mail him at jonathan@gaysocialites.com” or by clicking on the social networking links below.



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