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Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for...

CASTING CALL: "That's MISS FITS, to YOU!". 5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 19, 22 & 27, various times. Rehearsals, July 15...

Rockettes New York Spectactular

Theatre Review: “New York Spe...

If you love New York, there are a handful of lump-in-your-throat moments in the Rockettes' New York Spectacular. Sure, they are rather baldly emotio...

Photo:  PARAMOUR on Broadway - A Cirque du Soleil Musical;
Cast:
Indigo: Ruby Lewis
A.J.: Jeremy Kushnier
Joey: Ryan Vona
B-Roll video shoot photographed: Monday, May 2, 2016;  10:30 AM at the Lyric Theatre/Broadway, New York; Photograph: © 2016 RICHARD TERMINE 
PHOTO CREDIT - RICHARD TERMINE

Theatre Review: “ParamourR...

Even though Paramour is billed as a tribute to the golden age of Hollywood, it actually harks back to something much older, that great predecessor ...

Lena Hall photo credit David Andrako

Cabaret Review: Lena Hall

In some ways I'm the ideal target audience for Lena Hall's current cabaret show. I don't know how many other people would be so delighted that she c...

News

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Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for Fringe Musical Jonathan Warman is directing!

CASTING CALL: "That's MISS FITS, to YOU!". 5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 19, 22 & 27, various times. Rehearsal...

Entertainment

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Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for Fringe Musical Jonathan Warman is directing!

CASTING CALL: "That's MISS FITS, to YOU!". 5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 1...

Big Brother

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Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for Fringe Musical Jonathan Warman is directing!

CASTING CALL: "That's MISS FITS, to YOU!". 5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 19, 22 & 27, various times. Rehearsal...

Editorial

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Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for Fringe Musical Jonathan Warman is directing!

CASTING CALL: "That's MISS FITS, to YOU!". 5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 19, 22 & 27, various times. Rehearsal...

Nightlife

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Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for Fringe Musical Jonathan Warman is directing!

CASTING CALL: "That's MISS FITS, to YOU!". 5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 19, 22 & 27, various times. Rehearsal...

Casting Call: Drag Stars needed for Fringe Musical Jonathan Warman is directing!

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CASTING CALL: “That’s MISS FITS, to YOU!”.

5 Performances, NYC Fringe Festival, August, 13, 15, 19, 22 & 27, various times. Rehearsals, July 15-opening, evenings.

Auditions: July 6, 7 & 8, 2016. 7p.m. to 10p.m. At BoConcept: 144 W. 18th Street, NYC.

For audition appointment:

More info and music samples: http://thatsmissfitstoyou.weebly.com/

Seeking big drag personas, gender-funk, trans-actors, for a poly-gender, spiritual, mystery musical. Singers, dancers, comedians, lip-sync. 6 roles, age 20-40. 6 roles, age 40-70. Big characters. Plus one young muscular male, and one Judy Garland impersonator.

Audition in drag/gender-funk, or bring a photo.

Roles:

YOUNG MISS FITS
20 to 40 years old, all ethnicities male. Man in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). A starring part with singing and silent acting only — no lines. A powerful queer spirit guide.

MRS COUNTERPOINT
40 to 70 years old, all ethnicities male. Man in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). Always the show-woman / show-off, but also very tough. Lead role, singer/actor.

MISS ALLITERATION
40 to 70 years old, all ethnicities male. Man in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). Sweet and a bit mystical, comedian, very funny. Lead role, singer/actor.

MISS SERVICE WO-MAN
40 to 70 years old, all ethnicities male (could be FTM trans) in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). Military type, some severe up in here. Lead role, singer/actor.

MISS CONSPIRACY
40 to 70 years old, all ethnicities MTF trans or cisgender man in drag. Fierce, fierce, fierce. Lead role, singer/actor.

SERGEANT GRIM
40 to 70 years old, all ethnicities Policeman, stately and stern, butch yet androgynous, with secrets to spare. Lead role, singer/actor.

POLICE BOY
20 to 30 years old, all ethnicities male. Gorgeous young muscle stud eye candy. Has a solo song and some dialogue.

YOUNG MRS COUNTERPOINT
20 to 30 years old, all ethnicities male. Man in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). Always the show-woman / show-off, but also very tough. Major role, singer/dancer.

YOUNG MISS ALLITERATION
20 to 30 years old, all ethnicities male. Man in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). Sweet and a bit mystical, comedian, very funny. Major role, singer/dancer.

YOUNG MISS SERVICE WO-MAN
20 to 30 years old, all ethnicities male (could be FTM trans) in drag (room for “gender-funk”, a beard is possible but not required). Military type, some severe up in here. Major role, singer/dancer.

YOUNG MISS CONSPIRACY
20 to 30 years old, all ethnicities. MTF trans or cisgender man in drag. Fierce, fierce, fierce. Major role, singer/dancer.

JUDY GARLAND
20 to 50 years old, all ethnicities male or female. Impersonator of the legendary singer. Must give a convincing illusion of Miss Garland’s vocals, appearance and mannerisms. Has a featured song.

ROSA PARKS
40 to 45 years old, African American male or female. Woman or man in drag. Non-speaking dignified impersonation of the legendary civil rights activists. Depending on acting and vocal abilities may double as Service Wo-Man, Counterpoint, or Alliteration.

DURATION

July 15, 2016 – June 27, 2016

Theatre Review: “New York Spectacular”

Rockettes New York Spectactular

If you love New York, there are a handful of lump-in-your-throat moments in the Rockettes’ New York Spectacular. Sure, they are rather baldly emotionally manipulative, but I for one didn’t care – I got the feeling that all of the creators of this extravaganza were sincere in their own love of the Big Apple, and that makes a big difference.

Of course the Rockettes have been famous for over 80 years for their Christmas Spectacular. New York Spectacular replaces Christmas with the city itself, to marvelous effect. Broadway scribe Douglas Carter Beane (Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella, Xanadu, The Nance) weaves a story of two tourist kids separated from their parents during a summer vacation. Beane hit upon the clever idea of having the statues of the city be the children’s guides. In particular Euan Morton is fantastic, in silver-toned voice as main guide Mercury (from the front of Grand Central Terminal).

But of course the Rockettes are the star of the show. Their first entrance is breathtaking, as they charge through jets of stage fog, marching rapidly forward with their signature precision. The whole opening number totally whets the appetite for what follows. Highlights include a “Singing in the Rain” number in Central Park, a Fashion Avenue tribute set to Madonna’s “Vogue” – which has the added pleasure of seeing the Rockettes in glitzy non-matching outfits by Emilio Sosa (Project Runway, Motown the Musical, The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess) – and a finale satisfyingly full of high kicks.

Stunning projections by Moment Factory add considerably to the all-over spectacle. Director/choreographer Mia Michaels has pulled together a daunting number of elements and collaborators to put together an extravaganza that can hold its head up high next to the Rockettes’ legendary holiday-season shows. Recommended.

For tickets, click here.

To learn about Jonathan Warman’s directing work, see jonathanwarman.com.

Theatre Review: “Paramour”

Photo: PARAMOUR on Broadway - A Cirque du Soleil Musical; Cast: Indigo: Ruby Lewis A.J.: Jeremy Kushnier Joey: Ryan Vona B-Roll video shoot photographed: Monday, May 2, 2016; 10:30 AM at the Lyric Theatre/Broadway, New York; Photograph: © 2016 RICHARD TERMINE PHOTO CREDIT - RICHARD TERMINE

Even though Paramour is billed as a tribute to the golden age of Hollywood, it actually harks back to something much older, that great predecessor to musical comedy the “extravaganza.” A hundred years ago and more, these variety shows veiled with the thinnest of plots were thick on the ground, with titles like A Yankee Circus on Mars. One of the biggest hits of this kind was a version of The Wizard of Oz that had as much to do with Frank Baum’s books as – well, as Paramour has to do with Orson Welles.

And, judged as an extravaganza, Paramour is a marvelous success! The quality and daring of the circus acts that are the show’s real raison d’être are light years beyond anything that could even be imagined in those extravaganzas of old. The show’s design elements are truly eye-filling and -pleasing, combining state of the art technology with tricks that were old when A Yankee Circus on Mars hit the boards in 1905.

If anything I feel like the plot of Paramour should have been thinner. It tells the story of a love triangle between a Svengali director, a young starlet-in-the-making and her piano player. The only purpose of the plot is to provide a frame for Hollywood-inspired spectacle, but every so often, Paramour‘s writers seem to take the whole thing too seriously, which lands us in some of the evening’s most leaden moments.

Paramour is at it its best when taking spectacular flight, and thankfully that’s most of the time. Recommended.

For tickets, click here.

To learn about Jonathan Warman’s directing work, see jonathanwarman.com.

Cabaret Review: Lena Hall

Lena Hall photo credit David Andrako

In some ways I’m the ideal target audience for Lena Hall’s current cabaret show. I don’t know how many other people would be so delighted that she chose to do the Sex Pistols’ nihilistic masterpiece “Holidays in the Sun” in that high society boîte, the Cafe Carlyle. And sing it more beautifully than Johnny Rotten could ever hope to, while still preserving the sense of gleeful, feral rage that is so essential to the song.

When Hall is singing full-throated rock and roll, which is most of the show, she is an unquestionable fierce ruling diva. The subject matter of this show, titled “Oh! You Pretty Things”, is a thumb-sketch of Hall’s love life from her teenage years to today. Hall walks though this gallery of ex-boyfriends with her head held high, though I found myself wanting to hear more about her and less about them.

In any event, these tales of past romances are mostly mere springboards to some truly passionate singing. Most memorable are Hall’s rendition’s of Aerosmith’s “Dream On” and a handful of obscure Bowie ballads towards evening’s end. While it was its own kind of fun to see what was basically a rock concert in the Carlyle, I did sometimes feel that we lost lyrics, and Hall is a terrific actor-singer, so that aspect of the act was less than totally satisfying. Overall, though, the show was a genuine pleasure, and Hall an immensely engaging performer. Recommended.

For tickets, click here.

To learn about Jonathan Warman’s directing work, see jonathanwarman.com.

Cabaret Review: Charles Busch

Charles Busch_2016

Legendary playwright and drag performer Charles Busch has always combined elegantly languid, self-effacing charm with an effortlessly brassy glamour. Busch’s main line is comically complex hard-boiled dames, and while he doesn’t leave that behind entirely, this act is in general more sentimental and sincere. The most time he spends in “brassy-land” is when he’s portraying the character Miriam Passman, an under-talented, over-egotistical cabaret dilettante.

When not giving us Ms. Passman, this act is more of a “big sing” than previous presentations. Busch has a pleasantly throaty, not terribly strong, high tenor singing voice – but you don’t come to one of his acts for musical virtuosity. As with the greatest cabaret singers, it’s all about how Busch acts the story and emotion of a song.

The songbook for this show ranges from Jerome Kern to Paul Williams. For each song, Busch takes pains to clearly delineate the details of every image and event, with just a dash of his “dame” persona to give it all an elegantly wry air. He does a clutch of Sondheim songs, and it’s telling that most of them are from the quirky flop Anyone Can Whistle – sweetly off-kilter is the target, and Busch hits it with artful precision.

Busch sincerely loves artifice and invests every moment he has on-stage with substantial style – and a discreetly dishy side, as well. They don’t make ’em like this anymore, and there’s only one Charles Busch.

For tickets, click here.

To learn about Jonathan Warman’s directing work, see jonathanwarman.com.

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